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PSL-F2 skipper Daquis proud of young teammates

first_imgBREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “We really have to work hard because we were able to get the lead, pero kinakapos din talaga,” said Reyes. “Maybe next game makakabawi kami.”PSL-F2 Logistics had a 0-2 record in Pool A and was relegated the team to the classification stages.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Ayo helps ease pressure on Green Archers through counseling Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Team ‘Trabaho’ scores championship title at the last leg of Smart Siklab Saya Manila We are young Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND MOST READ Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise EDITORS’ PICK PSL F2 Logistics-Manila. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netIt may have come in a heartbreaking loss but the performances of the younger players of PSL-F2 Logistics Manila have certainly impressed their captain Rachel Anne Daquis.Jaja Santiago had 11 points in their 25-19, 25-15, 25-21 loss European champions Pomi Casalmaggiore in the FIVB Women’s Club World Championship while setter Kim Fajardo had a hand in almost all of the hosts’ points.ADVERTISEMENT “Kahit talo kami ngayon, sobrang saya kasi ganda ng laro ni Jaja plus sila Kimmy,” said Daquis Thursday at Mall of Asia Arena. “Pag pinapasok mga kababayan ko sobrang nakaka-proud kasi gustung gusto nilang lumaban.”“Kahit natatalo kami, natututo kami and napapakita namin talent namin.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agentPSL-F2 Logistics were in control in the third set against Pomi after taking an 18-13 lead, but the hosts eventually collapsed to the championship pedigree of the Italian Club as they got outscored 12-3 in the final moments.Middle blocker Mika Reyes they need to work hard if want to make defending world champions Eczacibasi Vitra Istanbul sweat on Friday. View commentslast_img read more

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Branislav expects PH volleyball to improve 30-40% after FIVB tilt

first_imgPumaren rues Warriors’ lack of discipline BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Chinese-manned vessel unsettles Bohol town Ginebra teammates show love for Slaughter BREAKING: Solicitor General asks SC to forfeit ABS CBN’s franchise Team ‘Trabaho’ scores championship title at the last leg of Smart Siklab Saya Manila EDITORS’ PICK Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan PLAY LIST 01:31Taiwan minister boards cruise ship turned away by Japan01:33WHO: ‘Global stocks of masks and respirators are now insufficient’01:01WHO: now 31,211 virus cases in China 102:02Vitamin C prevents but doesn’t cure diseases like coronavirus—medic03:07’HINDI PANG-SPORTS LANG!’03:03SILIP SA INTEL FUND MOST READ 30 Filipinos from Wuhan quarantined in Capas That 23-25 dent in Eczacibasi’s otherwise immaculate score sheet was the sign PSL-F2 Logistics head coach Moro Branislav was looking for as the catalyst for Philippine volleyball’s quick improvement.READ: PSL F2 wins set, but Eczacibasi bags victoryFEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra teammates show love for SlaughterSPORTSWe are youngSPORTSCone plans to speak with Slaughter, agent“This is a win for Philippine volleyball, after the tournament the level of Philippine volleyball will go up 30, 40 percent, this is very big,” said Branislav.Not only did PSL-F2 upset the defending champions, the seven local players started and ended the second set which is expected to be a massive boost of confidence.center_img Mainland China virus cases exceed 40,000; deaths rise to 908 PSL F2 Logistics Manila. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netIt may just have been one set, but the magnitude of PSL-F2 Logistics Manila’s shocker over defending champions Eczacibasi Vitra Istanbul is the first step to an eruption waiting to happen.The defending champions went through a test against the hosts and overcame the Filipinos in four sets, 25-17, 25-17, 23-25, 25-14, in their final group stage match in the FIVB Women’s Club Women’s Championship Friday at Mall of Asia Arena.ADVERTISEMENT Smart hosts first 5G-powered esports exhibition match in PH “After ng game namin, lumapit kami kay coach and nag thank you kami,” said Daquis as she held back her emotions.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Brad Pitt wins his first acting Oscar as awards get underway We are young “This is a very important experience for the Philippine players, I guarantee you, after this competition, Philippine players will be better in the ASEAN level,” said Branislav. “All 14 players were smiling and that’s important my work, I like that good atmosphere.”READ: Coach realistic of PSL-F2 Logistics’ chances in FIVB“The important thing is to prepare a good atmosphere for the team.”Team captain Rachel Daquis blushed up when Branislav gave them the opportunity to go all-Filipino and against the best club in the world nonethelesAnd if the team only spent a little over two minutes after every match, the players stayed quite a while longer in the court to huddle around Branislav and give him their thanks.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

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Tsetse fly numbers dwindle in the warming Zambezi Valley

first_imgAnimals, Cattle, Climate Change, Climate Change And Biodiversity, Climate Change And Extinction, Conservation, Diseases, Ecology, Environment, Extinction And Climate Change, Impact Of Climate Change, Infectious Wildlife Disease, Insects, Livestock, Mammals, Mosquitoes, Research, Water, Wildlife, Zoonotic Diseases Article published by John Cannon Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Tsetse flies carry the microorganism that causes sleeping sickness in humans and livestock, but a recent study reveals that their numbers have dropped at a site in the Zambezi Valley as temperatures have climbed.Sleeping sickness, known also as trypanosomiasis, is a debilitating and potentially deadly disease to humans that also kills perhaps 1 million cattle each year.The study’s authors say that the decline of the tsetse in Zimbabwe’s Zambezi Valley might be accompanied by a rise in their numbers in cooler locales where they once weren’t as prevalent. Rising temperatures seem to have made a southern African park less hospitable to the tsetse fly (Glossina spp.), the carrier of a dangerous disease-causing microorganism, new research shows.Named for the single-celled trypanosomes that infiltrate the bloodstream during a tsetse bite, trypanosomiasis, or sleeping sickness, kills perhaps a million cattle a year around the world. And for humans, it’s a painful disease that disrupts sleep patterns and can be deadly if left untreated.Sleeping sickness kills around a million cattle globally each year. Image by Justinjerez (CC BY-SA 3.0), via Wikimedia Commons.But over the past few decades, researchers in Zimbabwe’s Mana Pools National Park have noticed fewer flies. Those observations led disease ecologist Jennifer Lord of the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine in the U.K. and her colleagues to speculate that climate change might be tinkering with the ecosystem.Annual average temperatures are up by nearly 1 degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) and by 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) in the hottest month, November, at Rekomitjie Research Station in the park since the mid-1970s. Farmers haven’t worked the land since 1958, so most other conditions have been stable. At the same time, the number of flies that scientists are catching at Rekomitjie has dropped off. In 1990, they used to expect to catch about 50 tsetse flies around one cow; nowadays, they have to sample an average of 10 cows before finding just one fly.A tsetse fly (Glossina spp.), pictured here in Burkina Faso. Image courtesy of the International Atomic Energy Agency (CC BY-SA 4.0), via Wikimedia Commons.To test whether the climatic effect made sense, Lord and her team built a mathematical model that incorporated the impacts of temperature on tsetse fly reproduction and mortality, established in previous research. Higher temperatures speed up a fly’s metabolism, which means it has to find more animals or people to feed on. Each time a fly lands on a blood-bearing target, its chances of dying — from perhaps the swat of a hand or a tail — go up. Young pupae also tend to consume more of their fat stores when it’s warm, leaving them with less of this protection against starvation when they break out of their shells.The results of the team’s model fit well with the trend they observed, which could have broader implications in the region. They published their results Oct. 22 in the journal PLOS Medicine.“If the effect at Mana Pools extends across the whole of the Zambezi Valley,” Lord said in a statement, “then the transmission of trypanosomes is likely to … have been greatly reduced in this warm low-lying region.”Tsetse fly numbers at a research site in the Zambezi Valley have declined in the past three decades as average local temperatures have risen. Image courtesy of the International Atomic Energy Agency (CC BY-SA 4.0), via Wikimedia Commons.With few of these types of models, it’s been difficult for scientists to know what climate change might mean for the dynamics of diseases spread by insects.“We don’t know, for example, whether the resurgence of malaria in the East African highlands in the 1990s was caused by rising temperatures or by increasing levels of drug resistance and decreasing control efforts,” John Hargrove, an epidemiologist at Stellenbosch University in South Africa, said in the statement.Trypanosomes in a blood smear from a patient with sleeping sickness. Image courtesy of CDC/Dr. Myron G. Schultz (Public domain), via Wikimedia Commons.And though the decline of tsetse flies might seem like a welcome reprieve from a pest that spreads a devastating disease, the authors caution that it could just point to a shift in the territory that the flies stake out.“[Rising] temperatures may have made some higher, cooler parts of Zimbabwe more suitable for tsetse,” the authors write. This could potentially bring sleeping sickness to new locations where it was previously unknown.Banner image of a tsetse fly courtesy of the International Atomic Energy Agency (CC BY-SA 4.0), via Wikimedia Commons. CitationLord, J. S., Hargrove, J. W., Torr, S. J., & Vale, G. A. (2018). Climate change and African trypanosomiasis vector populations in Zimbabwe’s Zambezi Valley: A mathematical modelling study. PLOS Medicine, 15(10), e1002675.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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The legal institutionalization of FSC certification in Gabon (commentary)

first_imgCertification, Commentary, Editorials, Environment, Environmental Law, Forestry, Forests, Logging, Researcher Perspective Series, Timber, Timber Laws, timber trade, Tropical Forests Article published by Mike Gaworecki Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsoredcenter_img Gabon’s President Ali Bongo announced on September 26, during a visit to a Rougier wood processing plant, that all forest concessions in Gabon will have to be certified with the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) standard by 2022.Unlike its neighbors, Gabon has never shown any interest in the European proposal for a Voluntary Partnership Agreement, probably because its timber exports are increasingly focused on Asia. If other countries follow Gabon’s lead and make private certification mandatory (the Congo-Brazzaville is considering this in its forestry law under preparation), the European strategy, which gives only a secondary place to private certification, will probably have to be reviewed.The future will tell us whether the Gabonese decision is the first step in consecrating the power of private governance in an area that has long remained particularly sovereign, or whether the conversion of a voluntary instrument into a legal prerequisite is turning against the FSC by undermining its credibility.This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the author, not necessarily Mongabay. Gabon’s President Ali Bongo announced on September 26, during a visit to a Rougier wood processing plant, that all forest concessions in Gabon will have to be certified with the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) standard by 2022. There are about 40 active logging concessions in Gabon, covering nearly 16 million hectares or nearly 40 million acres.The FSC is considered the most demanding label in terms of forest management. Launched with the active support of WWF in 1993, this certification makes the bet that it is possible to exploit the forest without destroying it, and that the three pillars of sustainable development — ecological, social, and economic — can be reconciled.Known to be closer to NGOs than to industrialists, FSC has a “global” competitor, the PEFC (Program for the Endorsement of Forest Certification), launched with the support of the European timber industry. The PEFC was intended to be more appropriate to the fragmented structure of small European forest property (the original name was Pan European Forest Certification), before becoming a global program for the mutual recognition of national or regional certifications, often considered less demanding.A gradual process of institutionalizationForest certification is a voluntary instrument, based on the willingness of consumers to pay more for legal timber from “sustainable” forest exploitation. It assumes that the certified entity (an owner or concessionaire) goes beyond regulatory standards in environmental and social terms, and is committed to continuous improvement of its practices. The results must be measurable in the field and, of course, the certification must be carried out by third parties, certification bodies accredited by Accreditation Service International (ASI) on behalf of the FSC.The FSC has always wanted to be independent of public authorities by adopting a business-to-business model. The certifying bodies, for-profit organizations that are accredited on behalf of the FSC, are chosen and remunerated by the concessionaires who apply for certification. In the 1990s, FSC certification was viewed with caution, if not hostility, by professional foresters and developing country governments. They saw it as an encroachment on the prerogatives of forest services, which were supposed to have a monopoly on quality control in forest management. Gradually, companies selling their wood on ecologically sensitive markets (particularly in northern Europe) perceived the interest they had in adopting the FSC label, in order to maintain or increase their shares on these profitable markets. Southern governments, frequently attacked by NGOs for their lax enforcement of environmental laws, have highlighted the development of certification in their countries as evidence of their ecological virtue.Despite the initial skepticism of many observers about governance issues, the “Congo Basin” (a name that has become common in Central African forest countries) is the sub-region with the largest area of certified natural tropical forests (up to 5.6 million hectare in 2017). States have also begun to draw inspiration from the principles and criteria of certification for their own legislation. Borrowings, however, have remained modest, as the new generation of forest laws is still under preparation.At the end of the 2000s, the European Union made a proposal to tropical forest countries for voluntary partnership agreements (VPAs) to improve governance and eliminate illegal logging and trade. This process, known as FLEGT (Forest Governance, Law Enforcement and Trade), aims to restore the control capacities of administrations as the priority objectives. In the eyes of EU decision makers, FSC certification should remain in the field of private arrangements. In fact, in Central Africa, FSC certification has stagnated or even declined for several years. In parallel, the “legality certifications,” less demanding than the FSC and proposed by various organizations, attract several large forestry companies exporting to the EU, insofar as they help them to demonstrate the legality of the timber and its traceability from the forest to the port of shipmentGoverning by private instrumentsThe Gabonese President’s decision to require FSC certification is a further step in the use of private instruments for public regulation purposes. In concrete terms, it means that the Gabonese government “offloads” control of forest concessions onto an international organization (the FSC) and certification bodies. It can also be seen as an admission of the administration’s inability to regulate the sector and enforce forest management plans, which are legal obligations. This will undoubtedly accentuate the feeling of marginalization felt by many executives of the ministry in charge of forests, while the government has multiplied in recent years the creation of agencies, directly linked to the Presidency, for environmental management.Unlike its neighbors, Gabon has never shown any interest in the European proposal for a Voluntary Partnership Agreement, probably because its timber exports are increasingly focused on Asia. If other countries follow Gabon’s lead and make private certification mandatory (the Congo-Brazzaville is considering this in its forestry law under preparation), the European strategy, which gives only a secondary place to private certification, will probably have to be reviewed.President Bongo’s exclusive choice of the FSC is surprising, as the competing label (PAFC, Pan African Forest Certification, a partner of the PEFC), has begun to be deployed (the first PAFC certification took place in 2017 in Gabon) and a recent circular from the ministry in charge of forests pushed companies to commit themselves to PAFC certification. Several concessionaires have so far considered adopting this label, which does not question the exploitation within “Intact Forest Landscapes,” a concept put forward by NGOs referring to forested areas of at least 50 square kilometers (12,355 acres) not crossed by roads. At the FSC, the issue of IFLs is under discussion. The choice of FSC is therefore likely to be a problem at some point for companies having this type of “intact landscape” in their permits.Underlying policy objectivesOne of the objectives of Bongo’s measure is probably also to reduce the areas occupied by forest concessions in favor of an extension of protected areas (objective of the powerful National Agency for the Protection of Nature). The likely abandonment of permits by operators who will not be able or willing to certify will also free up space for the development of oil palm and rubber plantations by the Olam Group. This multinational agro-business corporation, headquartered in Singapore, was founded in 1989 by members of the Indian diaspora. With its two main shareholders, Mitsubishi and the Singapore Sovereign Wealth Fund, it now plays a key role in Gabon’s economy.The ban on log exports imposed by the Gabonese government in 2011 has led to a significant drop in timber production and a concentration of companies in the sector. The certification requirement, in turn, will lead to a new phase of concentration for the benefit of a limited number of large companies. With the three major companies now FSC-certified being European, the question is what will Chinese companies do, as they own more than half of the country’s concessions. It is likely that Chinese publicly owned companies, under Beijing’s control, would succeed in being certified, if they can control more strictly the practices of their subcontractors. However, for private Chinese companies, which are the most numerous, the task is difficult, and it is likely that many of them will not want to or be able to bear the costs of certification without being able to pass them on to the selling prices of wood. Their departure is, therefore, almost certain.A sign of Sino-Indian rivalry in Africa?Should this unprecedented political measure also be seen as a sign of growing competition between Indian and Chinese actors on the African continent? India, whose timber imports are growing faster than China’s, has clearly set its sights on Gabon to access Central Africa’s forest resources. The Free Zone of Nkok (Gabon Special Economic Zone, or GSEZ), built near Libreville by the Olam group to attract timber industries after the ban on raw timber exports, has attracted many Indian investors, much more than Chinese industrialists. These industries need large quantities of logs, which are supplied by the French group Rougier in particular through a contract with GSEZ, an entity co-managed by the Gabonese government and Olam.The reduction of Chinese companies’ control over Gabon’s forests could open up interesting opportunities for Indian industrialists wishing to acquire concessions to secure their wood supply, in a context of emerging overcapacity in wood processing in Gabon.A risk for the FSC?For the FSC, this announcement is a resounding recognition, especially since the words of the Gabonese president are laudatory (“in terms of quality, there is now an essential label that will guarantee access for our production to the reference markets, it is that of the FSC”). The FSC might have preferred the use of incentives (through tax reductions for certified concessions) to a government-mandated obligation, because the pressure from forest companies will be strong on the certifying bodies to obtain the necessary label.However, these organizations accredited on behalf of the FSC (which does not certify itself) are chosen and remunerated by companies applying for certification, and they have certain margins of interpretation of the criteria of “good forest management.” Some of these certifying bodies are known to be more understanding than others vis-à-vis their clients’ constraints. The FSC will have to pay particular attention to the quality of the certificates issued by these bodies, especially since NGOs hostile to industrial logging will not fail to try to call out companies constrained to FSC certification that have not really integrated the change in the managerial approach that must go with it.Forest certification is based on consumer confidence, in a context of uncertainty about the content of the notion of “sustainable forest management” of large tropical forests and controversies about the impacts of logging. It is, therefore, a fragile instrument, as trust can quickly be undermined by a few unfavorable media episodes. The future will tell us whether the Gabonese decision is the first step in consecrating the power of private governance in an area that has long remained particularly sovereign, or whether the conversion of a voluntary instrument into a legal prerequisite is turning against the FSC by undermining its credibility.Tropical timber with an FSC logo. Photo Credit: FSC GD/Jean Baptiste Lopez.This commentary is derived from a paper initially published in French at Willagri.com.Alain Karsenty, environmental economist, has been research director with CIRAD (Montpellier, France) since 1992. His research and expertise area covers the economic instruments for the environment, including taxation, Payments for Environmental Services (PES), and REDD+. He has an extensive knowledge of land tenure, concessions, forest policies and practices in West & Central Africa and Madagascar, his main areas of fieldwork. As an international consultant, he participated in several policy and economic reforms processes with national teams in Africa. He is the author of one hundred scientific articles and co-authored several books and special issues. He is a member of the scientific board of the French GEF (FFEM).FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.last_img read more

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The last trees of the Amazon

first_imgIllegally-sourced timber from Peru, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, and Colombia are incorporated into the international market with falsified official documents that are almost never verified.Timber traffickers are now pursuing new species of trees, but the countries’ governments do very little to protect the species. Alarmed by the entry of poachers who illegally cut down and stole the oldest trees from their territory, members of the Shawi indigenous community organized an assembly this past August to decide how to take action against the loggers.The trees were taken out on the only road that connects the Shawi community, in the northwestern Peruvian Amazon, to Balsa Puerto, the nearest district. After the road was destroyed by the heavy trucks that the loggers used to carry the cut sections of the trees, the Shawi created a roadblock and checkpoint to stop them.They accomplished what the Peruvian government has been unable to: control timber trafficking routes. But it led to a series of violent threats against the leaders of the Shawi community.It wasn’t the first time traffickers had threatened indigenous leaders. In September 2014, one of those threats was carried through to its grim conclusion: A group of illegal loggers murdered Edwin Chota, Leoncio Quinticima, Jorge Ríos and Francisco Pinedo, all members of the Saweto indigenous community in Ucayali, a region of Peru close to the Brazilian border.Chota, the community’s president, spoke out against timber trafficking for 12 years before his murder, but authorities have yet to begin a serious investigation. Nobody has been sentenced for the murders, and law enforcement hasn’t improved safety measures for other leaders being threatened, or reduced logging in prohibited areas. The trees cut down from these forests continue to feed into the sophisticated, multimillion-dollar timber trafficking industry in Peru.Globally, illegal timber trafficking is an industry worth more than $50 billion, according to the UN Environment Programme, and represents up to 30 percent of the timber sold around the world. #MaderaSucia (“dirty timber”) is an investigation aimed at analyzing the current situation of the Amazonian timber market and discovering the ways in which the traffickers launder their illegally obtained products into the global trade chain. The investigation was led by OjoPúblico and Mongabay Latam in partnership with a team of reporters from Colombia (Semana, El Espectador), Bolivia (El Deber), Mexico (Connectas) and Brazil (InfoAmazonia).False documents in the AmazonThe system that permits illegally sourced timber to be sold and exported legitimately is prevalent in all of the Amazonian countries covered in the investigation. The official documents, which don’t always take into account the verification processes used by officials in each country, allow the indiscriminate looting of forest resources from the Amazon. The United States and China are the most frequent destinations of the illegally-sourced timber.In the reported cases and interviews conducted for this investigative piece, authorities confirmed that timber traffickers often provided false information on official documents. In the majority of cases, the timber of illegal origin is sold with papers that falsely declare that the trees came from an authorized zone, when in reality they were taken from forests where logging is prohibited, such as natural protected areas or indigenous lands.This falsification of documents occurs most frequently in Peru, which exports more timber than any country, barring Brazil. In recent years, Peru’s Agency for the Supervision of Forest Resources and Wildlife (OSINFOR) has uncovered regional officials approving forest plans that claim to have scientifically impossible numbers of trees in certain areas. Others claim to have trees on riverbeds or on incorrect coordinates.Bolivian authorities have discovered a similar phenomenon: there, timber traffickers alter Forest Origin Certificates (CFOs) to include illegally sourced timber that they later sell.A similar situation takes place in Colombia, though to a lesser extent. Colombian news publications Semana and El Espectador report that up to 47 percent of the timber sold in the country is illegal, based on data from the Ministry of the Environment. They estimate the timber trafficking industry there may involve about $750 million per year, almost a third of the money involved in the country’s more notorious and high-profile drug trafficking industry.A study by Greenpeace reported that illegal loggers in Brazil also falsify information on the papers that certify the origin of ipê, a group of valuable timber trees from the Handroanthus genus. Some loggers there use a similar tactic: they declare the timber on their inventories, but their “origins” don’t match up with true locations. According to Greenpeace, the United States imports more ipê wood with falsified documents than any other country.In Peru alone, between October 2017 and August 2018, OSINFOR identified the illegal extraction of 25,455 cubic meters (898,950 cubic feet) of timber, or the equivalent of about 5,000 truckloads, valued at more than $30 million.Some of the timber taken from the Peruvian Amazon in the last few years was exported to Mexico, and then later to the United States. A report Connectas identified 10 companies that bought illegally sourced timber, after one of the most successful operations against the timber trafficking industry. The operation by the Peruvian police and district attorney’s office revealed that 81 percent of the timber that was sold had been taken from areas where logging is prohibited.last_img read more

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Global agreement on ‘conserved areas’ marks new era of conservation (commentary)

first_img Popular in the CommunitySponsoredSponsoredOrangutan found tortured and decapitated prompts Indonesia probeEMGIES17 Jan, 2018We will never know the full extent of what this poor Orangutan went through before he died, the same must be done to this evil perpetrator(s) they don’t deserve the air that they breathe this has truly upset me and I wonder for the future for these wonderful creatures. So called ‘Mankind’ has a lot to answer for we are the only ones ruining this world I prefer animals to humans any day of the week.What makes community ecotourism succeed? In Madagascar, location, location, locationScissors1dOther countries should also learn and try to incorporateWhy you should care about the current wave of mass extinctions (commentary)Processor1 DecAfter all, there is no infinite anything in the whole galaxy!Infinite stupidity, right here on earth.The wildlife trade threatens people and animals alike (commentary)Anchor3dUnfortunately I feel The Chinese have no compassion for any living animal. They are a cruel country that as we knowneatbeverything that moves and do not humanily kill these poor animals and insects. They have no health and safety on their markets and they then contract these diseases. Maybe its karma maybe they should look at the way they live and stop using animals for all there so called remedies. DisgustingConservationists welcome China’s wildlife trade banThobolo27 JanChina has consistently been the worlds worst, “ Face of Evil “ in regards our planets flora and fauna survival. In some ways, this is nature trying to fight back. This ban is great, but the rest of the world just cannot allow it to be temporary, because history has demonstrated that once this coronavirus passes, they will in all likelihood, simply revert to been the planets worst Ecco Terrorists. Let’s simply not allow this to happen! How and why they have been able to degrade this planets iconic species, rape the planets rivers, oceans and forests, with apparent impunity, is just mind boggling! Please no more.Probing rural poachers in Africa: Why do they poach?Carrot3dOne day I feel like animals will be more scarce, and I agree with one of my friends, they said that poaching will take over the world, but I also hope notUpset about Amazon fires last year? Focus on deforestation this year (commentary)Bullhorn4dLies and more leisSponsoredSponsoredCoke is again the biggest culprit behind plastic waste in the PhilippinesGrapes7 NovOnce again the article blames companies for the actions of individuals. It is individuals that buy these products, it is individuals that dispose of them improperly. If we want to change it, we have to change, not just create bad guys to blame.Brazilian response to Bolsonaro policies and Amazon fires growsCar4 SepThank you for this excellent report. I feel overwhelmed by the ecocidal intent of the Bolsonaro government in the name of ‘developing’ their ‘God-given’ resources.U.S. allocates first of $30M in grants for forest conservation in SumatraPlanet4dcarrot hella thick ;)Melting Arctic sea ice may be altering winds, weather at equator: studyleftylarry30 JanThe Arctic sea ice seems to be recovering this winter as per the last 10-12 years, good news.Malaysia has the world’s highest deforestation rate, reveals Google forest mapBone27 Sep, 2018Who you’re trying to fool with selective data revelation?You can’t hide the truth if you show historical deforestation for all countries, especially in Europe from 1800s to this day. WorldBank has a good wholesome data on this.Mass tree planting along India’s Cauvery River has scientists worriedSurendra Nekkanti23 JanHi Mongabay. Good effort trying to be objective in this article. I would like to give a constructive feedback which could help in clearing things up.1. It is mentioned that planting trees in village common lands will have negative affects socially and ecologically. There is no need to even have to agree or disagree with it, because, you also mentioned the fact that Cauvery Calling aims to plant trees only in the private lands of the farmers. So, plantation in the common lands doesn’t come into the picture.2.I don’t see that the ecologists are totally against this project, but just they they have some concerns, mainly in terms of what species of trees will be planted. And because there was no direct communication between the ecologists and Isha Foundation, it was not possible for them to address the concerns. As you seem to have spoken with an Isha spokesperson, if you could connect the concerned parties, it would be great, because I see that the ecologists are genuinely interested in making sure things are done the right way.May we all come together and make things happen.Rare Amazon bush dogs caught on camera in BoliviaCarrot1 Feba very good iniciative to be fallowed by the ranchers all overSponsored Article published by Mike Gaworecki Parties to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity have adopted the definition of a new conservation designation: ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’ (known informally as ‘conserved areas’).It represents a transformative moment in international biodiversity law and enables a greater diversity of actors — including government agencies, private entities, indigenous peoples, and local communities – to be recognized for their contributions to biodiversity outside protected areas.The ‘protected and conserved areas’ paradigm offers the global community an important means through which to respect human rights and appropriately recognize and support millions of square kilometers of lands and waters that are important for biodiversity, ecosystem processes, and connectivity — including in the Global Deal for Nature (2021-2030).This post is a commentary. The views expressed are those of the authors, not necessarily Mongabay. On November 29, 2018, the 196 Parties to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) adopted a decision that represents a high-water mark for the governance of protected areas and marks a new era of “protected and conserved areas.”The decision, made during the 14th Conference of the Parties (COP 14) to the CBD, builds upon more than 15 years of international-level progress on the governance aspects of protected areas and provides the CBD’s clearest elaboration of the principle of equity as it relates to conservation initiatives. The decision also defines and provides technical advice on “other effective area-based conservation measures” (referenced in Target 11 of the CBD’s Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2011-2020 and increasingly referred to as “conserved areas”), which will have far-reaching implications for the ways in which conservation is understood and undertaken.Tangible progress towards more effective and just forms of conservation is contingent on new relationships being forged at all levels. Unprecedented honesty, open-mindedness, and readiness to innovate on existing approaches are now required to maximize the multi-faceted potential of this new designation.The Dusun village of Buayan and the Crocker Range Park in the background (Sabah, Malaysia). Photo: © Harry Jonas.Conservation pastFifteen years ago, at the Vth IUCN World Parks Congress (Durban, South Africa), delegates took a major step forward in international policy on protected areas. For too long, protected area planners and managers had either ignored indigenous peoples’ and local communities’ contributions to biodiversity or actively undermined their relationships with territories, lands, and waters. Historical and ongoing injustices suffered by indigenous peoples and local communities in the name of conservation include the high incidence of their territories being overlapped by state-sanctioned protected areas.The World Parks Congress’s outcome documents, the Durban Accord and Action Plan (2003), heralded a “new paradigm for protected areas.” Together they helped transform global understanding of protected areas as being predominantly governed by state agencies to spaces that could be governed by other actors, including private entities, indigenous peoples, and local communities, or by shared arrangements. The Congress positively influenced the adoption of the CBD’s Programme of Work on Protected Areas (COP Decision VII/28, 2004), which enshrined the new protected areas paradigm in international law, particularly through Programme Element 2 on ‘Governance, Participation, Equity and Benefit Sharing’.A Raika herder with his camels in Rajasthan, India, where areas of high biodiversity, such as the areas now contained in the Kumbhalgarh Wildlife Sanctuary, have evolved through customary sustainable use of nature. Photo: © Harry Jonas.Conservation presentThe recent COP 14 Decision on “Spatial Planning, Protected Areas and Other Effective Area-based Conservation Measures” contains detailed guidance on governance diversity, equity, and protected areas and represents a high-water mark in the evolution of international law on these issues. Yet, while a number of countries have developed more progressive approaches to protected areas — such as the Indigenous Protected Areas Programme in Australia and the community conservancy models in Namibia and Kenya, among others — the new paradigm for protected areas generated only a limited increase in consideration of governance and equity aspects of protected areas and in the number of protected areas reported as governed by indigenous peoples and local communities.The 2018 Protected Planet Report states that 14.9 percent of land and 7.3 percent of the ocean are currently under protected areas. However, indigenous peoples and local communities govern only 1,377 (less than 0.6 percent) of all reported protected areas in the World Database on Protected Areas. In contrast, governments govern 194,836 (nearly 82 percent) of all reported protected areas. This gap becomes even more striking when considering that indigenous peoples’ territories are estimated to coincide with 80 percent of the world’s biodiversity and that indigenous peoples are (conservatively) estimated to manage or have tenure rights over at least 38 million square kilometers (nearly 9.4 billion acres), or more than a quarter of the world’s land surface.A proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus) in community lands within the Lower-Kinabatangan Segama Wetlands Ramsar Site (Sabah, Malaysia). Photo: © Harry Jonas.Why is there such a stark contrast between the large extent of biodiversity under the collective control and stewardship of indigenous peoples and communities and the relatively low number of community-governed protected areas reported to the World Database on Protected Areas? At least three big-picture factors contribute to this situation.First, over the twentieth century, many biodiverse areas within territories of indigenous peoples and local communities were unilaterally declared as state-governed protected areas.Second, there is a time-lag between advancements in international law and policy and their adoption at (sub-)national levels. In many countries, the laws, institutions, and conservation practices have not progressed at the same speed as at the international level, and often continue to deny indigenous peoples and local communities the enabling conditions, guarantees, and safeguards that might otherwise encourage them to consider designating their territories, lands, and waters as protected areas. International law means little if it is not integrated into (sub-)national frameworks and implemented on the ground.Third, the conceptual basis of many protected areas frameworks — especially the definitional requirement that they are specifically dedicated to conservation — in many instances does not align with indigenous peoples’ and local communities’ worldviews and governance and knowledge systems, which are often based more on sustainable use than strict protection.The newly agreed definition and criteria of a conserved area (“other effective area-based conservation measure” in CBD terminology) is intended to enable greater recognition and support for the conservation of biodiversity by a diverse set of actors — including indigenous peoples and local communities — occurring outside protected areas. The key difference between a protected and a conserved area is that while a protected area should be dedicated for conservation, a conserved area can have a wide range of management objectives so long as the area delivers the effective in situ conservation of biodiversity (as defined by the CBD).CBD definition of a ‘protected area’:A geographically defined area which is designated or regulated and managed to achieve specific conservation objectives.CBD definition of an ‘other effective area-based conservation measure’ (conserved area):A geographically defined area other than a Protected Area, which is governed and managed in ways that achieve positive and sustained long-term outcomes for the in situ conservation of biodiversity, with associated ecosystem functions and services and where applicable, cultural, spiritual, socio–economic, and other locally relevant values.This innovation offers an opportunity for indigenous peoples and local communities, among others, who govern and manage biodiversity-rich areas for a range of cultural, spiritual, ecosystem, and/or other related values, to designate and report them as conserved areas and to secure state backing to protect them against threats. It also promotes synergies between human rights, diverse governance systems, and the effective conservation of biodiversity.Tense moments as a Friends of the Chair group discusses a last-minute addition to the text of the CBD decision made by the International Indigenous Forum on Biodiversity. Photo: © Harry Jonas.Conservation Futures: 2018-2020Just as 2003 is known for ushering in the new paradigm for protected areas, 2018 marks the formal international adoption of an even more inclusive approach to conservation, with protected areas and conserved areas representing distinct yet complementary conservation designations. In the same way that it is taking time for the Vth World Parks Congress’s outcomes to be adopted and acted upon at (sub-)national levels, there is a danger that the opportunities offered by this new designation will be squandered.This could happen in at least two ways: First, states may simply not act upon the COP14 decision and instead continue on a “conservation as usual” trajectory, which the 2018 Protected Planet Report concludes is failing biodiversity and ecosystems. Conversely, in a rush to achieve Aichi Target 11 by 2020, particularly the quantitative targets of spatial coverage of terrestrial and marine areas, government agencies may act in ways that run counter to the spirit and content of the COP14 decision, including by recognizing and reporting conserved areas without due process and the free, prior, and informed consent of custodian indigenous peoples and local communities.However, there is a third way. Meaningful progress requires inclusive processes to identify, recognize, and secure both protected and conserved areas under the full spectrum of governance types, with the full and effective participation of all relevant governance authorities. Mindsets, laws, institutions, and approaches will need to be reconfigured, fundamentally in some cases, despite the challenges in doing so.Where this has started to happen, such as through a process led by the Indigenous Circle of Experts in Canada, the conceptual and ethical space and ensuing dialogues are providing a potentially transformational foundation for “co-creation, collaboration and reconciliation” in the context of conservation and the appropriate recognition of and support for Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas. One such example is the recently declared 14,218-square-kilometer Edéhzhíe Indigenous Protected Area designated by the Dehcho First Nations Assembly and the accompanying expansion of the Dehcho K’éhodi Stewardship Program, both with the support of the federal government.“We are failing to arrest biodiversity loss. We urgently need to address this silent catastrophe through nothing less than a shift in societal narratives.” – Cristiana Paşca Palmer (right), CBD Executive Secretary, speaking at the opening of CBD COP 14. Photo: © IISD/ENB | ENB.Conservation Futures: 2021-2030Looking ahead, we need to ask ourselves what the inclusion of conserved areas in international biodiversity law means for the next decade of biodiversity goals and targets from 2021-2030 — referred to by some as the Global Deal for Nature. New area-based targets are already being proposed and hotly debated, such as protecting 30 percent of the planet by 2030 or “Half Earth” by 2050. Many of these initiatives rightfully acknowledge the central importance of recognizing and supporting indigenous peoples’ and local communities’ rights and conservation efforts in achieving their targets. Yet the exact substance and ambition of new spatial targets will require reconsideration in light of the new designation as well as the extent of the areas that might already constitute “conserved areas” (once assessed on a case-by-case basis).Area-based targets in the post-2020 framework should explicitly include both protected areas and conserved areas. They should include ambitious spatial coverage elements and tangible qualitative elements on governance, participation, equity, and rights and responsibilities. Perhaps they should also dis-aggregate between protected and conserved areas and/or between different governance types to better recognize the direct contributions of non-state actors. Towards that end, a wide range of actors must fully engage with the implications of the CBD decision on protected and conserved areas adopted at COP 14. Only then can we collectively take new steps of change toward living in harmony with nature.Harry D. Jonas, LLM, is an international lawyer at Future Law, co-chair of the IUCN WCPA Task Force on Other Effective Area-based Conservation Measures and an Ashoka Fellow.Holly C. Jonas, LLM, is a founder and director of Future Law and the International Policy Coordinator of the ICCA Consortium, a global member-based association dedicated to self-strengthening and securing collective territories and areas governed, managed, and conserved by indigenous peoples and local communities.Both authors are writing in their personal capacities and their views do not necessarily represent the views of the organizations with which they affiliated.FEEDBACK: Use this form to send a message to the author of this post. If you want to post a public comment, you can do that at the bottom of the page.center_img Commentary, Community-based Conservation, Conservation, Conservation Philosophy, Editorials, Environment, Indigenous Communities, Indigenous Peoples, Indigenous Rights, Innovation In Conservation, Marine Protected Areas, Protected Areas, Researcher Perspective Series last_img read more

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