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Energy from new Australian wind farms cheaper than from new coal or

first_img © 2013 Phys.org (Phys.org)—A new study has found that in Australia electricity from new wind farms will be cheaper than that from new coal or gas power plants, which overturns the common presumption that renewables are more expensive than coal or gas. Explore further Citation: Energy from new Australian wind farms cheaper than from new coal or gas plants, report shows (2013, February 8) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-02-energy-australian-farms-cheaper-coal.html The analysis of Australia’s energy options was carried out by a Sydney team belonging to the research company Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF). The team modeled the prices of electricity from a variety of sources, and found electricity from a new wind farm could be supplied at $80 (AUD) per MWh, while electricity supplied by a new gas power plant would cost $116, and a new coal plant $143. These prices included the Labor government’s carbon tax, but wind was cheaper even without carbon pricing being factored in. The analysis also predicted that large solar photovoltaic installations will be cheaper than coal or gas by 2020, and solar thermal and biomass systems will be at least competitive by 2030.The costs of renewables such as wind and solar are dropping but the costs of new coal and gas plants are rising, especially as the study found the four major banks in Australia were less likely to finance new fossil fuel power plants unless an expensive risk premium was included. The prices of coal and gas are also rising because of the carbon tax and export markets, especially for liquid natural gas, pushing local prices up.The CEO of BNEF, Michael Liebreich, said their findings that electricity from new wind farms is cheaper than new fossil fuel plants even in a country like Australia with its vast reserves of coal and gas, and this result “promises to turn the economics of power systems on its head.” It also makes it likely that Australia will move increasingly towards investing in renewables and away from fossil fuels in the coming decades, unless the prices of fossil fuels drop and remain low.Kobad Bhavnagri of BNEF added that new coal-fired power plants are too expensive in Australia now and therefore no new ones are likely to be built, especially as the carbon price is expected to rise substantially, possibly tripling by 2030 from its current level of 23 AUD per tonne. By the time Australia needs to consider building new power plants (2020-30), renewables will be even more attractive, and new technologies may have been developed to deal with the intermittency problems of these renewable source of power.At present, electricity from the existing coal and gas power plants is cheaper than from new renewable sources because the fossil fuel plants were built in the 1970s and 80s and their construction costs have been paid off. Policies such as the Large-scale Renewable Energy Target will be needed to ensure Australia develops the infrastructure and skills needed to meet the target of 20 percent renewables by 2020, and to transition to renewable energy as the primary source of power. The current figure is 9.6 percent.center_img Renewables could bring job boon to Poland: Greenpeace A wind farm in South Australia This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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Researchers find emperor penguins outer feathers colder than surrounding air

first_img(Phys.org) —A research team made up of members from France and the U.K. has discovered that when in cold temperatures, the outer feathers of the emperor penguin are actually colder than the surrounding air. As the team describes in their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, they discovered the unusual thermal properties of the penguin’s feathers while studying the birds in their natural environment using infrared imaging. Journal information: Biology Letters © 2013 Phys.org Explore further More information: Emperor penguin body surfaces cool below air temperature, Published online Biology Letters, March 6, 2013. doi: 10.1098/rsbl.2012.1192AbstractEmperor penguins Aptenodytes forsteri are able to survive the harsh Antarctic climate because of specialized anatomical, physiological and behavioural adaptations for minimizing heat loss. Heat transfer theory predicts that metabolic heat loss in this species will mostly depend on radiative and convective cooling. To examine this, thermal imaging of emperor penguins was undertaken at the breeding colony of Pointe Géologie in Terre Adélie (66°40′ S 140° 01′ E), Antarctica in June 2008. During clear sky conditions, most outer surfaces of the body were colder than surrounding sub-zero air owing to radiative cooling. In these conditions, the feather surface will paradoxically gain heat by convection from surrounding air. However, owing to the low thermal conductivity of plumage any heat transfer to the skin surface will be negligible. Future thermal imaging studies are likely to yield further insights into the adaptations of this species to the Antarctic climate.Press release Emperor penguins use sea ice to rest between long foraging periodscenter_img Citation: Researchers find emperor penguins outer feathers colder than surrounding air (2013, March 7) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-emperor-penguins-outer-feathers-colder.html Thermal image of penguin. Credit: Université de Strasbourg and Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Strasbourg, France To gain a better understanding of how emperor penguins are able to withstand extremely low temperatures for months at a time, the research team ventured down to Terre Adélie, Antarctica, during June 2008. There they took hundreds of infrared thermal images of penguins that had moved slightly apart from the others—that allowed for full body images to be taken and minimized the collective warming that occurs as the animals huddle together.Upon examining the multicolored images, the researchers were surprised to discover that the outer feathers that cover most of the penguins’ body, were actually four to six degrees Celsius colder than the surrounding air. With most other birds, and animals, the air around their bodies is warmer. The researchers explain that the apparent anomaly appears to be due to what they describe as “extreme radiative cooling.” It’s similar to frost building up on surfaces on a cold morning. It happens with the penguins when their protective coat radiates more heat into the colder sky than is absorbed from the surrounding air—this causes the temperature at the surface of their feathers to fall below that of the surrounding air. The end result, the researchers report, is that the penguins are able to draw very tiny amounts of heat back to their feathers from the surrounding air, helping them to conserve energy. It’s not much, the researchers conclude, but when trying to survive in a very cold climate for very long periods of time, every little bit helps.In looking at the thermal images, the researchers also noted that the birds do have a few “hot” spots—eyes, beak and feet, where heat escapes. The eyes in particular, bright red in the photos, suggest that penguins must take care to protect such vulnerable areas from bitter wind. They note that earlier studies have found that the more at-risk areas of the penguins’ body have special blood vessels that help to conserve heat. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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NASA and partners to send test solar sail craft into space next

first_img IKAROS unfurls first ever solar sail in space © 2013 Phys.org Citation: NASA and partners to send test solar sail craft into space next year (2013, March 13) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-nasa-partners-solar-craft-space.html (Phys.org) —NASA has announced a project with space company L’Garde Inc. to send a test craft into space sometime next year powered only by a solar sail. The craft, called Sunjammer, after the short story by Arthur C. Clarke about yacht races in space that relied on the solar wind to carry them along, will be much larger than any other tested in space before. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Explore further More information: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/tdm … arsail_overview.htmlwww.lgarde.com/programs/space- … ropulsion/sunjammer/ The Sunjammer project represents another step forward in researching and testing such craft—it will be considerably larger than the NanoSail-D, or the IKAROS, a solar sail vehicle launched by Japan that same year. This new sail will be square with 124 foot long sides and will be made of Kapton, a material that is strong enough to withstand micrometeoroid strikes, provides thermal insulation and can also serve as a shield against radiation. And because it can be made into a very thin fabric, the sail will only weigh 70 pounds and can be folded for deployment into a package small enough to fit into an ordinary dishwasher, making it relatively cheap to send aloft.Scientists are hoping that spacecraft powered by solar sails can help overcome some of the limitations of conventionally powered space craft, the main one being the need to carry fuel onboard. Researchers are hoping to learn whether it will be feasible to send such a craft to another star system for example, or perhaps to provide for a new type of satellite system or even as means for putting together a long-term project to clean up the space debris circling the globe.NASA plans to launch the craft aboard a rocket provided by SpaceX sometime next year. The idea is to test the feasibility of solar sail powered craft both as near-Earth vehicles and as those used to travel out of the solar system. In this new project, NASA has teamed with L’Garde to build the craft and is also working with people from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The deployment of a solar sail powered craft would be the second for NASA, after the NanoSail-D project in 2010.Solar sails work by making use of the momentum of photons traveling from the sun. When they strike a sail, their momentum is transferred to it, pushing the vehicle to which they are attached through space. And while the amount of force they are able to exert is small (about 0.01 Newton for Sunjammer), the continuous pressure causes a constant acceleration that can lead to a craft eventually moving at very high rates of speed.last_img read more

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DNA analysis of Denisovan molars offers more clues about ancient human relative

first_imgDenisova 4 molar. Credit: Bence Viola © 2015 Phys.org The Denisovans are considered to be cousins of modern humans, occupying a branch of the family tree-but, like the Neanderthal, they eventually disappeared. It is believed that they were likely hunter-gatherers, and possessed characteristics that have been passed down to some human groups, such as the ability to live at high altitudes. The discovery of the Denisovan species has led to speculation about other unknown human relatives such as the origins of a human-looking tooth recently unearthed in China. Denisova 3 finger bone next to a penny for scale. Credit: Bence Viola. More information: S. Sawyer et al. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA sequences from two Denisovan individuals, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2015). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1519905112AbstractDenisovans, a sister group of Neandertals, have been described on the basis of a nuclear genome sequence from a finger phalanx (Denisova 3) found in Denisova Cave in the Altai Mountains. The only other Denisovan specimen described to date is a molar (Denisova 4) found at the same site. This tooth carries a mtDNA sequence similar to that of Denisova 3. Here we present nuclear DNA sequences from Denisova 4 and a morphological description, as well as mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data, from another molar (Denisova 8) found in Denisova Cave in 2010. This new molar is similar to Denisova 4 in being very large and lacking traits typical of Neandertals and modern humans. Nuclear DNA sequences from the two molars form a clade with Denisova 3. The mtDNA of Denisova 8 is more diverged and has accumulated fewer substitutions than the mtDNAs of the other two specimens, suggesting Denisovans were present in the region over an extended period. The nuclear DNA sequence diversity among the three Denisovans is comparable to that among six Neandertals, but lower than that among present-day humans. Denisova 3 finger bone. Credit: Bence Viola. Denisova 8 molar, top view. Credit: Bence Viola. Genetic testing shows Neanderthals less diverse than modern humans Denisova 3 finger bone. Credit: Bence Viola.center_img Explore further Citation: DNA analysis of Denisovan molars offers more clues about ancient human relative (2015, November 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-11-dna-analysis-denisovan-molars-clues.html The existence of the Denisovans was discovered back in 2008 when a team of scientists found a finger bone and a tooth in the Denisova caves in the Russian mountains. Two years later the bones were identified as belonging to the same species—in this new effort, the researchers have sequenced the nuclear and mitochondrial DNA from the first molar and from another that was found more recently, and have found, among other things, that the bones came from three different individuals, from different time periods—the oldest from approximately 110,000 years ago, which suggests they were around during the time of Neanderthals, and of course, early humans.The size of the teeth suggests that the Denisovans had very large jaws and more likely resembled Neanderthals than humans. The team also found that the Denisovans had nearly as much genetic diversity as modern humans, setting them apart from Neanderthals—and modern Melanesian humans have approximately 5 percent of their genome, strongly hinting that they interbred with humans. The huge time span (60,000 years) between the times the individuals that once owned the teeth were alive suggests also that the Denisovans were in Siberia for a very long time, either living there, or visiting during warm months. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Phys.org)—A team of researchers with members from Germany, Canada and Russia has conducted a DNA analysis of two molars found in the Denisova caves in Siberia shedding more light on the origins of the Denisovans—a hominin species that lived or at least visited Siberia approximately a hundred thousand years ago. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes their analysis and what they have learned about the extinct species. Denisova 3 finger bone next to a penny for scale. Credit: Bence Viola. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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3D printing hierarchical liquidcrystalpolymer structures

first_imgPrinting hierarchical thermotropic LCPs using fused deposition modeling. a) short rod-like polymer chains formed by an aromatic random copolymer consisting of the rigid monomers p-hydroxybenzoic acid and 2-hydroxy-6-napththoic acid, b) the rigid and imperfectly oriented polymer rods align along the same director n in the melt, misaligning θ towards the director to form a nematically ordered domain, c) the quasi-isotropic bulk of the polymer was formed via locally aligned nematic domains with randomly oriented directors, d) during extrusion through the heated nozzle (at temperature TN with diameter dN), the directors were subjected to shear forces of elongation that can rearrange polymers in the melt and align the directors along the direction of extrusion, e) once extruded, the material began to lose its orientation at the same time the solidification front froze the nematic order to place, starting from the surface. The resultant effects formed a core-shell structure with a highly aligned shell of thickness λN, f) depositing material on a surface at height h promoted further alignment of the director in the print direction to form a core-shall structure with different skin thickness due to distinct cooling rates for air, glass and polymer substrate. [THB: temperature of the heated bed/substrate; TRT: temperature of the environment (room temperature); VE: velocity of extrusion; VP: printing velocity; w: print width; λA: thickness of skin aligned to air; λH: thickness of skin aligned to the heated bed/substrate], g,h) the chain ends can cross-link chemically via thermal annealing to increase the molecular weight stress transfer between filaments. Credit: Nature Letter doi:10.1038/s41586-018-0474-7. Biological materials from bone to spider-silk and wood are lightweight fibre composites arranged in a complex hierarchical structure, formed by directed self-assembly to demonstrate outstanding mechanical properties. When such bioinspired stiff and lightweight materials are typically developed for applications in aircraft, automobiles and biomedical implants, their manufacture requires energy and labor-intensive fabrication processes. The manufactured materials also exhibit brittle fracture characteristics with difficulty to shape and recycle, in stark contrast to the mechanical properties of nature. Existing polymer-based lightweight structure fabrication is limited to 3-D printing, with poor mechanical strength and orientation, while highly oriented stiff polymers are restricted to construct simple geometries. In an effort to combine the freedom of structural shaping with molecular orientation, 3-D printing of liquid-crystal polymers was recently exploited. Although desirable shape-morphing effects were attained, the Young’s modulus of the soft elastomers were lower than high-performance liquid-crystal synthetic fibers due to their molecular structure. , Advanced Materials The LCP filament properties correlate with the printing conditions, a) false-color scanning electron microscopy image of the tensile-tested vertical filament confirms a core-shell structure. The core of the fibre is still intact indicating that the shell of the LCP is the stiffer-phase, b) polarized light microscopy of a 100 µm cross-section confirms the presence of the core-shell structure in the vertical (b) and horizontal (c) filaments as indicated by the more intense illumination of the skin of the printed filaments compared to the core, d) X-ray diffraction measurements confirm a higher fraction of oriented polymers in thinner samples. The young’s modulus was subsequently computed for the samples at different conditions. Credit: Nature Letter doi:10.1038/s41586-018-0474-7. More information: Silvan Gantenbein et al. Three-dimensional printing of hierarchical liquid-crystal-polymer structures, Nature (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41586-018-0474-7 Raphael Schaller et al. High-performance liquid-crystalline polymer films for monolithic “composites”, Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing (2015). DOI: 10.1016/j.compositesa.2015.11.024 Steven W. Cranford et al. Nonlinear material behaviour of spider silk yields robust webs, Nature (2012). DOI: 10.1038/nature10739 Arda Kotikian et al. 3D Printing of Liquid Crystal Elastomeric Actuators with Spatially Programed Nematic Order, Advanced Materials (2018). DOI: 10.1002/adma.201706164 Ulrike G. K. Wegst et al. Bioinspired structural materials, Nature Materials (2014). DOI: 10.1038/nmat4089 Explore further , Nature Materials To fully exploit the shaping freedom of 3-D printing and favorable mechanical properties of molecularly oriented liquid-crystal polymers (LCP), a team of scientists at the Department of Materials, ETH Zürich, proposed a novel approach. The strategy followed two design principles that are used in nature to form tough biological materials. Initially, anisotropy was achieved in the printing process via self-assembly of the LCP ink along the print path. Thereafter, complex-shaping capacity offered by the 3-D printing process was exploited to tailor the local stiffness and strength of the structure based on environmental loading conditions. In the study, Silvan Gantenbein and co-workers demonstrated an approach to generate 3-D lightweight, recyclable structures with hierarchical architecture and complex geometries for unprecedented stiffness and toughness. The results are now published in Nature.Features of the novel material arose from the self-assembly of liquid-crystal polymer molecules into highly oriented domains – achieved during extrusion of the feedstock material. Orienting the molecular domains with the print path reinforced the polymer structure to meet the expected mechanical stresses. The results led to the development of materials with strength and toughness that outperformed state-of-the-art 3-D printed polymers, comparable with the highest performance lightweight composites hitherto constructed. The study demonstrated the ability to combine top-down 3-D printing with bottom-up molecular control of polymer orientation, opening the possibility to freely design and fabricate structures that circumvented typical restrictions of the existing manufacturing process. By structure, the rigid molecular segments of aromatic thermotropic polyesters could self-assemble into nematic domains at temperatures higher than the material’s melting temperature. Polymer melt extrusion through the 3-D printer nozzle gave rise to shear and extension flow fields that aligned the nematic domains in the direction of flow. A temperature gradient subsequently formed between the cold surface of the filament and its hot interior for rapid cooling at the surface, causing solidification in the flow-aligned arrangement. Polymer chains present in the interior of the filament experienced slower cooling to re-orient, driven by thermal motion. As a result, the extruded filaments possessed a core-shell structure in which a highly aligned skin enclosed a less oriented core. The thickness of the skin relied on the diameter of the filament and the operating temperature. The printed LCPs surpassed existing material types including reinforced polymers and continuous fibre-printed composites to match the stiffness and strength of carbon fibre-reinforced polymers. Additional features of the process included recyclability, automated manufacturing and lower carbon footprint. The 3-D printing techniques and the proposed additive technology allowed the production of application-specific complex geometries. The authors envision that it will be possible to achieve unparalleled levels of hierarchical structural complexity for lightweight materials by combining 3-D printing-based path control, alongside tunable orientation of self-assembled building blocks in the ink. The strategy opens up the possibility of fabricating structures that can fulfill diverse requirements as a sustainable material with a circular life. The effect of the printing parameters on the final core-shell architecture was decided using a simple analytical heat-transfer model. The authors used optical microscopy and X-ray scattering experiments to confirm the highly aligned skin structure. The core-shell filaments demonstrated significant mechanical strength and elastic modulus, in contrast to previous studies that used fused deposition modeling (FDM). The Young’s modulus of the material relied on the production of filaments thinner than the nozzle diameter for effectively improved stiffness and strength of the printed materials. Additional factors including the manufacturing temperature, layer height, molecular crosslinks and annealing time affected the Young’s modulus of the printed materials. Characterizing the mechanical properties and complex geometry of 3D printed LCP laminates and parts: a) mechanical response under tension detected for an example LCP laminate plate with a central hole to highlight the improved properties of a filamentous architecture designed to follow the stress-lines developed within the loaded material, b) open-hole strain maps measured by digital image correlation just before fracture, c) Ashby diagrams demonstrating the specific stiffness and specific strength (left) and damping (right) properties of LCPs compared to other isotropic counterparts as well as alternative state-of-the-art polymers or reinforced composite materials (σ: strength; ρ:density; ABS: acrylonitrile butadiene styrene; CFRP: carbon fibre reinforced polymer; GFRP: glass fibre reinforced polymer; PEEK: polyether ether ketone; PLA: polylactic acid), d,e) example 3D printed LCP parts with complex fibre architecture geometries: d) impact resistant Bouligand-type structure with twisted plywood arrangement of printed fibers and e) biomedical implant with a local bearing enhancement where the print lines were programmed to follow the principle stress direction around the holes. Credit: Nature Letter doi:10.1038/s41586-018-0474-7. The scientists observed multiple stress peaks for stress-strain measurements during materials characterization that resembled toughening mechanisms of biological materials such as bone. This was credited to the thermal treatment process to enhance crosslinks between the filaments for stress transfer; preventing delamination through crack-arresting mechanisms. The high toughness of the annealed laminates was thought to emerge from hierarchical cross-linking of macromolecules and filaments.The material construction enabled self-assembly and hierarchical macromolecular cross-linking strategies via layer-by-layer additive manufacture to replicate bioinspired design principles. High-performance laminates with higher strength and Young’s modulus without damping loss were achieved by tuning the fibre orientation to best match the stress lines throughout the mechanically loaded structure. The ensuing product demonstrated characteristics unprecedented in lightweight materials. Citation: 3-D printing hierarchical liquid-crystal-polymer structures (2018, October 9) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-d-hierarchical-liquid-crystal-polymer.html Adding nanoparticles to a polymer matrix enhances the thermo-mechanical properties of the materials © 2018 Phys.org Journal information: Nature This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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BI wants IOA to resolve Sarita issue with AIBA

first_imgSeeking to distance itself from the controversy surrounding L Sarita Devi’s semifinal loss in the Asian Games, recently-elected Boxing India President Sandeep Jajodia Friday said the matter is for the IOA to resolve with world governing body AIBA.‘Boxing India is saddened by the developments involving Ms. Sarita Devi and the emotional outburst of the celebrated pugilist. We sincerely hope the matter will be expeditiously resolved by the IOA with AIBA in the best interest of the boxer, the sport and the country,’ Boxing India said in a statement. A disconsolate Sarita had refused to accept her bronze medal at the podium to protest the semifinal loss to South Korean Jina Park. She is now facing disciplinary action from the AIBA and Jajodia said the matter needs to be resolved at the earliest.last_img read more

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Portion of road at Behala collapses disrupts traffic

first_imgKolkata: A large portion of road in Buroshibtala main road area at Behala caved in on Monday morning triggering panic among commuters. The matter was immediately brought to the notice of Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) by the traffic police.A team of civic engineers rushed to the spot. The area was cordoned off by the police to check any untoward incidents. Later, the KMC engineers were pressed into service. A JCB machine was engaged to dig the road surface to determine the exact cause of subsidence. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsTraffic came to a halt as the road was barricaded for a few hours in the morning. This resulted in traffic congestion in the area. The senior KMC officials asked executive engineer of the borough to repair the road properly. State Public Works Department workers also rushed to the spot.The KMC engineers acted on a war footing and started the repair work. They were also investigating if there are chances of a future cave-in in the adjacent area. The KMC engineers are also looking into the possible reasons behind the cave in.Locals, however, alleged that the portion of the road caved in as heavy vehicles ply through the area. They also alleged there was no proper police surveillance in the area. The road is not meant for the heavy duty trucks, alleged the locals. If the heavy vehicles are not restricted on the road, there could be fatal road accidents, complained the locals.last_img read more

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Presidency students union no longer wants Anuradha Lohia as VC

first_imgKolkata: The Independents’ Consolidation (IC) student union at Presidency University wants to meet Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee and Governor Keshari Nath Tripathi, the chancellor of the university and urge them not to reappoint Anuradha Lohia as the Vice-Chancellor of the university.The current term of V-C Lohia is ending on April 30 and a search committee has been constituted for the selection of a new V-C.”We have source information that she may be appointed as the VC again. She had been at the helm of this institution for four years and there has been hardly any development. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsAlumni like Sankha Ghosh, Jawhar Sircar too had expressed their dissatisfaction over the way Presidency has functioned during her tenure,” Sayan Chakravarty of IC said.The IC members said they had taken the opinion of the students and the majority of them do not want Lohia as the V-C again. According to sources in the Higher Education department, the search committee that has been formed comprises Nirmal Ganguly, former director of Indian Council of Medical Research, Ved Prakash, former chairman of University Grants Commission (UGC) and V-C of Rabindra Bharati University Sabyasachi Basu Ray Chaudhury. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedSources in the university said V-C Lohia is likely to be asked to continue after May 1 since the search will take some time. It may be mentioned that Lohia was appointed as the first full-term V-C of Presidency University in 2014 after physicist Sabyasachi Bhattacharya, who was named the VC, wrote to the Governor that he cannot accept the offer.Lohia’s tenure had its share of ups and down. She had to face a series of controversies, including student unrest in the initial years after she took charge.last_img read more

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Security situation India tells citizens to leave Yemen

first_img“We are urging and advising our nationals to leave the country immediately through available commercial means,” Spokesperson in the External Affairs Ministry said While noting that it was the third such advisory by the government, he hoped that the Indians, most of whom are nurses in Yemen, will understand the “seriousness” of the situation and will return. He added that the government was working with the nurses for their return while putting number of Indians in Yemen at 3,000-3,500 who are living in various provinces including Sanaa. Also Read – Need to understand why law graduate’s natural choice is not legal profession: CJIIndia and Qatar ink six PACTSIndia and energy-rich Qatar on Wednesday signed six agreements including one on transfer of sentenced prisoners as the two countries sought to inject a fresh momentum in their bilateral ties. The pacts were signed after Emir of Qatar Tamim Bin Hamad Al Thani held extensive talks with Prime Minister Narendra Modi during which both the leaders discussed a range of issues including enhancing cooperation in energy sector and boosting trade and investment. Also Read – Health remains key challenge in India’s development: KovindUnder the provision of the pact on transfer of sentenced persons, Indian prisoners convicted in Qatar can be brought to India to serve the remaining part of their sentence. Similarly Qatari citizens convicted in India can be sent to their home country to serve jail term. According to official figure, 96 Indians are currently languishing in various jails in Qatar which is home to around 600,000 Indians. The other five MoUs will provide for cooperation in areas like information and communication technology, atmospheric and ocean sciences and media. PM to visit france, Germany, Canada Prime Minister Narendra Modi will embark on an eight-day tour of France, Germany and Canada on April 9 with a focus on attracting investment and enhancing overall cooperation with the three countries. Modi will first travel to France on April 9 and from there he will leave for Germany on April 12.last_img read more

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US woman jailed on murder charge after taking abortion pill

first_imgAdvocates on both sides of the abortion debate said they are stunned that police arrested a Georgia woman on murder charges after a hospital social worker told officers she terminated her pregnancy by taking abortion pills.Kenlissia Jones, 23, of Albany was being held at the Dougherty County jail on charges of malice murder and possession of a dangerous drug. District Attorney Greg Edwards said yesterday afternoon that he is reviewing the case, but “as of right now she’s still charged.”  Also Read – Pro-Govt supporters rally as Hong Kong’s divisions deepenJones was arrested Saturday after a county social services worker called police to a hospital, according to an Albany police report. A hospital social worker told police that Jones said she had taken four pills she purchased over the Internet “to induce labor” because she and her boyfriend had broken up.The social worker told police Jones went into labor and delivered the fetus in a car on the way to the hospital. The fetus did not survive. The police report does not say how far along Jones was in her pregnancy. Also Read – Pak Army ‘fully prepared’ to face any challenge: Army spokesmanWALB-TV reported earlier that authorities said Jones was about 5 and a half months pregnant.Prosecuting Jones seems at odds with Georgia case law, said Lynn Paltrow, an attorney and executive director of National Advocates for Pregnant Women, a legal group in New York.She noted state law explicitly prohibits prosecuting women for feticide involving their own pregnancies. And a Georgia appeals court ruled in 1998 that a teenager whose fetus was stillborn after she shot herself in the abdomen could not be prosecuted for performing an illegal abortion. Prosecutors ended up dropping that case.last_img read more

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