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A weight on your mind

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Key takeaways from the 2020 virtual WorkSpace Conference

first_imgHowever, last Friday’s event – Property Week’s first ever full-day virtual event – offered some of the biggest names in the industry the perfect opportunity to debate the future of the office as Covid-19 ushers in a period of “revolution, not evolution” – the theme of this year’s event.We round up some of the key takeaways from the jam-packed event, hosted by Julia Streets, founder and director of Streets Consulting, and run in parallel to sister title AV Magazine’s AV Works.The office isn’t deadThe big question on everyone’s lips was: has the return to working from home killed off the office? Reassuringly, the answer was a resounding ‘no’.Although speakers accepted that workers would want to work both from home and the office, throughout the day, they stressed the importance of the personal connection, interaction and collaboration that could only be achieved in the workplace.“I don’t refer to it as working from home but living at the office,” said Derwent London chief executive Paul Williams. “Over the last few weeks, we’ve had more and more occupiers who want to get back into the office to collaborate and tap into that creativity again.”Young disadvantagedArgent office and investment lead Helen Causer noted that younger workers rely on being in a collaborative workplace. She cited research from Cushman & Wakefield that showed around half of workers felt their learning was suffering while working at home.“Young people have been disproportionately disadvantaged by Covid-19,” she said. “I challenge business leaders to think about how they can support those younger people.“This is a whole generation of talent being impacted and they will continue to be impacted by it for years to come.”Demand dynamicsA panel on investment and occupier demand in UK cities discussed how Covid-19 had affected and would continue to affect central business districts in key locations.Dan Bayley, BNP Paribas Real Estate’s head of tenant representation, said that at the start of the pandemic, colleagues in business parks had geared up for a big drive into out-of-town offices. However, this had not yet materialised.I feel as an occupier that this industry is slow to change Alan Bainbridge, BBC“I see no evidence of a surge towards business parks out of London,” he said. “If people don’t want to commute into London, they won’t want to go to an office in Surrey that has no buzz.”Hines senior managing director Ross Blair said investor demand for office buildings was still there and that the interim drop-off in deals was primarily down to viewing difficulties.“A volatile market provides the most interesting investment opportunities,” he said. “But in the London investment market, people want to see the physical space, and with 70% of London investment volumes from overseas, they can’t get on planes and see the spaces right now.”Landlords and tenantsAlso under the spotlight during the event was the changing relationship between landlords and tenants. Katrina Kostic Samen, director and head of workplace strategy and design at KKS Savills, said the shift to remote working had had a huge impact on both occupiers and landlords.“I hear from occupiers that they want the current leasing structure changed,” said Kostic Samen. “There’s been talk about whether upwards-only rent reviews might be abolished, and there are questions around the flexibility of the 20-year lease.”She added: “The whole landlord-tenant relationship has changed. Everybody wants to have great relationships, but what really happens is you do the deal and move on.“Now, it has to be a blurring of the lines between the landlord and the tenant. You have to listen to what the customer wants; you can’t just pay lip service.”Occupiers in driving seatKaren Cook, founding partner of PLP Architecture, said the tenant experience was at the forefront of its design process for the nearly-completed skyscraper, 22 Bishopsgate, developed by AXA IM – Real Assets and Lipton Rogers.“Individuals demand more choice and control over how, when and where they work,” she said.Embodied carbon as a driver of carbon can’t be ignored any more  Juliette Morgan, British Land“For a building to really support the individual, and to create an environment that is as good as or better than your environment at home, you need to create a microcosm of the village, which includes the high street, a park, your doctor’s office and the coffee shop.”Alan Bainbridge, director of workplace and corporate real estate at the BBC, agreed that the occupier now had the upper hand and criticised the property industry for not being sufficiently occupier focused.“I think it has exposed the property industry as being supply-led and not client/consumer-led,” he said.“I feel very much as an occupier that this industry is slow to change and driven by other forces than customer satisfaction and delight.”Flexible revolutionAnother key talking point was the growing number of operator landlord partnerships in the flexible workspace arena.Kostic Samen said that working with flex operators instead of simply letting space to them was now one of KKS Savills’ priorities.Andrew Lynch, co-founder and chief operating officer of operator Huckletree, echoed this point from the other side of the fence.“Gone are the days when co-working operators took extremely long leases, fitted out [the space] and tried to sell it back to the public,” he said.Embodied carbonAnother huge talking point at this year’s WorkSpace was the impact of Covid-19 on the climate agenda. Many experts fear that we could see a repeat of 2008 when the financial crisis totally derailed the sustainability agenda just as it was gaining traction.However, Juliette Morgan, head of sustainable development at FTSE-100 property giant British Land, said that embodied carbon remained the top priority for developers.“Having audited our portfolio and worked with JLL to look at what the key drivers of our carbon impact are in the world, for me it’s really driven by embodied carbon, so essentially the materials and fit-out,” said Morgan.“Many of us forget that 40% of the embodied whole lifecycle carbon of that building goes into fit-out. From my perspective, embodied carbon as a driver of carbon can’t be ignored anymore.“There’s been a long history of rightly reporting on operational carbon, but we have a big opportunity to build lighter through our materials and commission. Even if you’re not the developer or landlord, you can still have a huge impact on that through fit-out.”Derwent’s Williams added: “Climate change will affect human beings for many, many decades going ahead. Covid-19 is a moment in time and we’re working hard to keep staff, our children, everybody safe; but climate change is a fundamental issue, which is why we have committed to being at zero carbon by 2030.”last_img read more

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Different Drums

first_imgMost fans that follow professional golf often witness a group of players who seem to come straight from Hollywood casting. They all seem to look alike, act alike, and go about their profession much in the same way. This week, I want to write about two players who stroll down a fairway much less traveled.Let me begin with someone who does it his way. I am talking about a gangly-looking golfer who plays left-handed.He has such a unique swing that most of the time his feet leave the ground on impact — a swing that nobody would dare teach to anyone trying to learn the game. So it makes sense that this player claims he has never had a lesson, and I believe him.Two fun facts about this player: When playing at home and just for fun, his personal golf cart is a one-of-a-kind Hovercraft. Secondly, he’s a vintage car nut and the proud owner of the “General Lee” car from “The Dukes of Hazzard” television series.About four years ago, this famous golfer moved from Tiger Woods’s former mansion in Orlando, which he owned at the time, to Pensacola, Florida, which is closer to his roots in Baghdad, Florida, where he indulged himself in two more of his off-course passions: ice cream and minor league baseball. You guessed it . . . soon after making the move, he purchased an ice cream shop and became part owner of the Pensacola Blue Wahoos, a minor league baseball team.By now I’m sure you’ve guessed that this mystery man is Bubba Watson. He has 14 wins, two of which are Masters victories, and three wins this season, currently the only player to do so. He has already met the criteria to someday be inducted into the Golf Hall of Fame.Bubba and his wife, Angie, a Canadian and former WNBA player, have adopted a little boy and a little girl and continue down that fairway less traveled as a very happy family.Another current player on Tour that has a great deal of difficulty talking golf with his peers is Bryson DeChambeau, the only physics major ever to play on Tour. Oh, by the way, Bryson can play. He became only the fifth player in history to win the NCAA Individual Championship and the U.S. Amateur in the same year.It’s safe to say that Bryson is either a brilliant mind or a “Mad Scientist,” or both, when it comes to playing golf. Recently it was noted Bryson was using a compass to locate hole locations on the greens in order to get the “exact” hole location. The USGA is reviewing the Rules of Golf to determine whether using a compass is legal or not. What makes Bryson different, other than his brilliant mind, you might ask? Well, all of Bryson’s clubs are the length of his seven iron, which is the club with which he hits best. When it comes to tech talk, Bryson is all alone on his less traveled fairway.Some musings about this past weekend . . . Let’s begin with Tiger, who finished tied for fourth, his best finish so far on this most recent comeback to competition. Tiger put a new putter in the bag and actually putted very well, except for a few short ones that even you and I could make. Tiger played so well that he made as many birdies as the winner. However, he also made far too many bogies to get near the leader. It’s safe to say that there’s a definite improvement and like millions of golfers worldwide, we love watching him play.The winner of the Quicken Loans National was Francesco Molinari from Italy. The last time an Italian won on the U.S. Tour was 1947, when Tony Pena got the job done. Molinari played so well that he won by eight shots and made 21 birdies, with only one bogey all week long.The next time Tiger will tee it up will be at the British Open Championship in two weeks. I will be there as Tiger goes for his 15th Major win. Tiger’s Carnoustie record: T7 in 1999 and T12 in 2007. Woods has won the Open Championship three times, twice at St. Andrews and once at Royal Liverpool.Now for a brief shout-out to David Toms, who won the USGA Senior Open, which put an end to a seven-year drought between victories. To make it even better, it was a family affair as Toms’s son, Carter, who plays on the LSU golf team, subbed in for regular caddie, Scott Gneiser, who felt chest pains and was replaced after the first two days. Scott is a longtime friend and I wish him well. I wonder how Toms is going to handle the payments to his two caddies. Sharelast_img read more

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Lectures Tackle Issues Affecting Black Community

first_imgBridgehampton Child Care and Recreational Center is kicking off a Thinking Forward lecture series with “Equality Matters in the Hamptons,” on Saturday, February 1. The date coincides with the start of Black History Month.Kofi Appenteng, president of the Africa-America Institute, will talk about the critical role the continent plays in the global conversation. With more than 30 years of international and domestic experience as a corporate lawyer, investment banker, and board director, Appenteng will touch on topics from the achievements of Afro-descendants to the role such knowledge plays in today’s curriculum. He was born in Ghana, West Africa, and studied in England before coming to the United States to further his education at Wesleyan University.Appenteng became the first African American to become a partner at a major law firm in New York City and also served as board chair of the Ford Foundation Center for Social Justice. He was named a Great American Immigrant by the Carnegie Corporation of New York in 2013.The 5:30 PM discussion will be moderated by Ken Miller, a writer, financier, political activist, and longtime advisory board member of the Bridgehampton Child Care and Recreational Center.A second session, “Well, Well, Well,” will be held on Saturday February 29 at 3:30 PM. A screening and panel discussion of the film “Death by Delivery,” which exposes how bias in health care and societal inequities drive a maternal care crisis for black women in America, will be shown. The lecture will be moderated by Rev. Tisha Williams, a pastor at the First Baptist Church in Bridgehampton. Dr. Florence Rolston is also a special guest. The Bridgehampton Child Care and Recreational Center is located at 551 Sag Harbor Turnpike. The lectures are free, and refreshments will be served. Visit www.bhccrc.org or call 631-537-0616 for more information.nicole@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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Dominion wins contracts

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Babcock refits Bibby Offshore’s DSV Polaris

first_img[mappress]Press Release, March 17, 2014 The project was Bibby’s largest ever refit package and underlines Babcock’s move to expand its role in the maintenance and refitting of complex oil and gas support ships.The Bibby Polaris vessel is one of Bibby’s international fleet consisting of eight subsea support vessels, including the most modern fleet of DSVs in the North Sea. The refit was a statutory five year class renewal and maintenance period, and included major packages of work undertaken and supported by Babcock on the dive bells and dive systems, thrusters and engines, fresh water and cooling systems, underwater valves, crane maintenance, structural work on moonpool hatches, lifeboats and davits, and accommodation upgrades, as well as a full topside and underwater paint package.Babcock’s focus on offshore vessel refit and repair sector at its Rosyth dockyard is part of a move to diversify into complementary markets where it can apply its considerable ship maintenance and support skills and experience to the benefit of commercial customers.To take a virtual tour of the Bibby Polaris vessel click hereBabcock Commercial Marine Director David McGinley points out that the company’s pedigree and expertise in ship maintenance and support are particularly valuable in supporting a sector in which the window of availability for refit is relatively short and seasonal, thereby helping customers in the sector to maximise operations within the annual cycle.David McGinley said: “In the case of the Bibby Polaris, for example, we de-mobilised the vessel on completion of its latest dive programme in preparation for the docking period and were able to offer valuable flexibility in the docking date to suit the vessel’s changing schedule.”He added: “We have an on-going working relationship with the Bibby Line Group but the refit of the Polaris vessel is our first significant project supporting Bibby Offshore. By providing our services within sectors such as oil and gas we are able to apply our considerable skills and expertise, as well as optimising our infrastructure and resources, maximising efficiency and keeping costs down for our customers within the tight timescales they work within.”Tom Paling, Global Fleet Operations Manager for Bibby Offshore commented: “I was satisfied with the performance of the yard and the work performed. The Bibby Polaris docking was both a complex and intense project with a very large, varied scope to be completed within an agreed timeframe. The facilities at Rosyth are very good and it is in close proximity to our normal operating area, minimising large deviations.”He continued: “We have a very open relationship based more around partnership as opposed to a customer-client dynamic. The team at Babcock were customer focused and flexible in dealing with a changing vessel schedule and meeting our requirements.”The Bibby Polaris undocked last month (February) on completion of the successful refit by Babcock. Babcock has successfully completed a contract to undertake a substantial refit on Bibby Offshore’s dive support vessel, Polaris, at its Rosyth dockyard.last_img read more

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Transafe in large refinery project

first_imgTransafe chartered a vessel to deliver a gas compressor, oil separator, oil cooler, and after cooler vessel from Antwerp to St Petersburg, ready for oncarriage to Volgograd.The largest module destined for Lukoil’s Volgograd refinery was a stripper column, which had the dimensions 29 m x 4.47 m x 4.83 m and weighed 98 tonnes. The column was delivered to the port of Rostov-on-Don on a chartered vessel, reloaded onto a lowbed trailer and trucked over 500 km to the destination.Transafe explained that both the height and weight of the column made the transportation quite challenging, and an extra saddle had to be produced in Rostov-on-Don in order to ensure proper weight distribution of the cargo on the trailer.Prior to executing the project, Transafe undertook extensive feasibility and route surveys from the Rostov-on-Don berth to the job site.The Volgograd oil refinery is the largest refinery in Russia’s south administrative region and is currently undergoing a major reconstruction.  www.transafe.ru/projectslast_img read more

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Walter Presents: Pakt preview – an undercurrent of menace and threat drives this dark crime drama

first_imgThe first word that came to me whilst watching this dark Polish thriller was “brooding”. It has an undercurrent of menace and threat throughout the opening episodes. It’s very Nordic Noir in its approach – so if you enjoy dark crime dramas from our Scandinavian friends (and who doesn’t?), this should be right up your blood-stained street.If you want to avoid spoilers for Pakt, stop reading now.The main character in Pakt is Piotr – an investigative journalist who receives anonymous information about fraudulent activity at an energy company, the Hydro Foundation. The mole who is leaking the sensitive information is pushing Piotr to publish the exposé; but his editor is worried that doing so might result in a lawsuit. When they receive further evidence in the form of bank statements, they go ahead and publish the story, but with fatal repercussions for Piotr’s family.Credit: Walter PresentsThe narrative then jumps forward ten months. Piotr is summoned to a lawyer’s office to hear the last will and testament of his late brother. He and his sister-in-law are given an envelope with location coordinates inside and told to be there on a specific date and time. They drive to the remote location and witness an apparent violent suicide that seems to have links back to the exposé nearly a year previously.The story, whilst purely fictional, is based on a series of revelations in Poland and elsewhere in Easter Europe during the late 1980s that focussed on individuals who got extremely wealthy after the collapse of communism – not all of them entirely legally.The show is shot beautifully, with particularly skilful use of drones to give us aerial views of the bleak urban landscape. There’s one particular scene following his brother’s funeral where Piotr’s the last to leave the car park. The overhead camera shows his car pulling away, leaving a dry silhouette of the vehicle on the wet ground. Simple, but wonderfully evocative and effective camerawork. And special mention of the background music too – a sombre, ethereal soundtrack by Polish composer, Łukasz Targosz, that perfectly represents the gritty nature of the series.Credit: Walter PresentsPiotr is played Marcin Dorocinski, whose acting career includes roles alongside David Tennant in Spies Of Warsaw, with Olivia Coleman in the Channel 4 mini-series, Run, and opposite Patrick Wilson in the film Jack Strong. He’s superb as the ambitious journalist whose life is turned upside-down by the story he exposes. Also worthy of mentioning is the performance of Marta Nieradkiewicz as the paranoid anti-corruption police officer, Weronika Zawadzka, whose report into the corruption at the company is leaked to the press.Walter Presents have given us two series (just six episodes in each) to get our teeth into, and on the evidence of the first couple of episodes, it’s going to be well worth watching.Walter Presents brings the first two series of Pakt to All 4 from 10th January 2020.last_img read more

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Cavs’ Deal For Kyle Korver No Longer Paused by Dunleavy

first_img Sam Amico Related TopicsCleveland CavaliersKyle KorverMike Dunleavy Mike Dunleavy has decided he will indeed report to the Atlanta Hawks following a trade from the Cavaliers over the weekend, NEO Sports Insiders has learned.Dunleavy was sent to the Hawks with Mo Williams, a first-round draft pick and cash for swingman Kyle Korver.Dunleavy did not report in a timely manner and initially sought a contract buyout. That held up Korver’s chances to suit up for the Cavs.The Cavs did not practice Monday, so Korver wasn’t missing much.Now, Korver is expected to at least be in uniform for the Cavs’ game Tuesday at Utah. If not Tuesday, then almost certainly Wednesday at Portland.Korver may not play in a game, however, until the Cavs visit Sacramento Friday. They then play at Golden State in a finals rematch on MLK Day.Dunleavy was traded from Chicago to the defending champion Cavaliers in the offseason.He told NEO Sports Insiders the deal “was like Christmas in July for me.”But at 36 years old and coming off back surgery, he struggled with his perimeter shot. Had he filled his role, the Cavs never would have made the deal for Korver.They are hoping Korver, 35, can spot up next to LeBron James, Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love and drain two or more 3-pointers a game, spreading the floor and keeping opposing defenses honest.It’s a role the Cavs have needed since the injury to starting shooting guard J.R. Smith, out 10-14 weeks with a thumb injury.Korver is likely to come off the bench, while first-year Cavs guard DeAndre Liggins starts, coach Tyronn Lue said.Now that Korver is in place, the Cavs have turned their attention to obtaining a backup point guard, as the Dunleavy trade opened a roster spot.The Cavs could also trade for another big man before the February deadline.last_img read more

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Dominant Windies take charge

first_img Veteran seamer Kemar Roach bowled superbly to claim four for 30 while new-ball partner Shannon Gabriel worked up a fair turn of pace on the two-paced surface to finish with three for 45. NORTH SOUND, Antigua (CMC): Another incisive display from West Indies’ seamers once again brutally exposed England’s suspect batting, as the visitors folded cheaply in their first innings to give the hosts command of the opening day of the second Test here yesterday. Still brimming with confidence following their dominant first-Test victory last weekend in Bridgetown, the Windies hardly put a foot wrong as they bundled England out for 187 before reaching the close on 30 without loss – 157 runs behind heading into today’s second day at the Vivian Richards Cricket Ground. Veteran seamer Kemar Roach bowled superbly to claim four for 30 while new-ball partner Shannon Gabriel worked up a fair turn of pace on the two-paced surface to finish with three for 45. Alzarri Joseph snatched two for 38 – both wickets coming before lunch as West Indies started the day strongly and dictated the opening session. Left-hander Moeen Ali top-scored with a counter-attacking 60 while Jonny Bairstow also played authoritatively for his 52. Wicketkeeper Ben Foakes chipped in with 35 but was one of four wickets to tumble after tea as England’s lower order was wiped out by the hostile pair of Roach and Gabriel 52 minutes after the resumption. Chasing their first series win over a higher-ranked side in seven years, West Indies made early breakthroughs after winning the toss and choosing to bowl. England made a circumspect start, but it was Roach who made the breakthrough, having left-hander Rory Burns caught at ­second slip for four by captain Jason Holder going low to his right, with the score on four in the fifth over of the morning. Debutant Joe Denly (6) made an inauspicious start to his international career, toe-edging Joseph’s first ball of the morning – a wide long hop – to be caught at the wicket at 16 for two, nearing the hour mark. PRIZED WICKET Joseph then got the prized wicket of Joe Root for seven, the England skipper gloving a snorter to third slip, where John Campbell parried for Shai Hope, running around from fourth slip to complete the catch at 34 for three, three-quarters of an hour before lunch. And England suffered yet ­another blow about 20 minutes before the break when Jos Buttler edged an out-swinger from Holder to Campbell at second slip to fall for one. Bairstow chose attack as the best form of defence, hammering nine fours and a six – an astonishing blow over extra cover off Holder – in a breezy 64-ball knock, to be unbeaten on 52 at lunch with England on 78 for four. But not for the first time, England wobbled after a break as West Indies struck twice in the space of 23 minutes after the resumption. First, England lost Bairstow to the second ball of the session without adding to his interval score leg before wicket on review to a full-length one from Roach that swung back. Three overs later, left-hander Ben Stokes failed to survive a hostile spell from Gabriel and nicked a catch behind to wicketkeeper Shane Dowrich for 14. In crisis on 93 for six, Moeen ­followed Bairstow in counter-attacking, as he posted an ­invaluable 85 for the seventh wicket with Foakes to keep the Windies ­without further success in the session. Moeen played with freedom, gathering eight fours and a six off 104 deliveries while Foakes was the more patient of the two in an 84-ball innings that contained four fours. However, any hopes of ­continuing the rebuilding efforts perished quickly after the break as England lost their last four wickets for 15 runs in the space of 10 overs. SCOREBOARD ENGLAND 1st Innings R. Burns c Holder b Roach 4 J. Denly c wk Dowrich b Joseph 6 J. Bairstow lbw b Roach 52 *J. Root c Hope b Joseph 7 J. Buttler c Campbell b Holder 1 B. Stokes c wk Dowrich b Gabriel 14 Moeen Ali c Gabriel b Roach 60 +B. Foakes b Gabriel 35 S. Curran c (sub) S Brooks b Roach 6 S. Broad not out 0 J. Anderson b Gabriel 1 Extras (w1) 1 TOTAL (all out, 61 overs) 187 Fall of wickets: 1-4, 2-16, 3-34, 4-55, 5-78, 6-93, 7-178, 8-186, 9-186, 10-187. Bowling: Roach 15-5-30-4, Gabriel 15-5-45-3, Joseph 10-3-38-2, Holder 13-5-43-1, Chase 8-1-31-0. WEST INDIES 1st Innings K. Brathwaite not out 11 J. Campbell not out 17 Extras (lb2, nb1) 3 TOTAL (without loss, 21 overs) 30 To bat: D Bravo, S Hope, R Chase, S Hetmyer, +S Dowrich, *J Holder, K Roach, A Joseph, S Gabriel. Bowling: Anderson 6-1-10-0, Broad 7-2-10-0, Stokes 5-2-5-0, Curran 3-0-3-0. Position: West Indies trail by 157 runs with all 10 wickets intact. Toss: West Indies. Umpires: Kumar Dharmasena, Chris Gaffaney; TV – Rod Tucker.last_img read more

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